Radioembolization Y-90 Alamogordo

With improved survival rates and cost-effectiveness, yttrium-90 (90Y) microsphere radioembolization has been establishing itself as an alternative treatment to surgical resection of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver cancers such as hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and metastatic breast cancer. In addition, radioembolization appears to be the best option in patients who cannot undergo surgery due to poor overall health or advanced age, or who have experienced disease progression after surgery or during chemotherapy.

Introduction
Radioembolization is a highly useful treatment for primary or metastatic liver cancer. In recent years, yttrium-90 (90Y) microsphere radioembolization has been establishing itself as a safe and efficacious treatment for both primary and metastatic liver cancers. This extends to both first-line therapies as well as in the salvage setting. In addition, radioembolization appears to have a high degree of specificity when it comes to targeting the tumor mass while sparing adjacent healthy tissue.

What is radioembolization?
Radioembolization is a type of cancer treatment that is used for both primary and metastatic liver cancers. The process involves the injection of microscopic beads that contain radioactive substances, known as yttrium-90 microspheres, into the hepatic artery. This allows the radiation to be delivered directly to tumors in the liver which has proven to be safe and effective in recent years.

How is radioembolization used to treat cancer?
Radioembolization is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the injection of yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres into the vascular system. The particles are too small to be seen on an x-ray, but they travel through the body via the bloodstream. When they reach the tumor, they release radiation which kills cells in a targeted area without affecting healthy tissue nearby.

What are the side effects of radioembolization?
The side effects of yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization are rare but can be severe. The most common adverse events are fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and loss of appetite.

Conclusion
Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microsphere offers a promising alternative to liver resection for both primary and metastatic liver cancers. It can be used as a first-line therapy or in the salvage setting. In addition, it has been shown that it is a safe and effective treatment.

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